Strong Homes: Affordable, Resilient Recovery

Following major disasters, the most vulnerable are usually the last to recover - sometimes they never do.

When survivors of disasters rebuild, they often end up where they started - with a home constructed the same way as before that can fall again in the next hurricane or flood.

Why try to save a few dollars when placing a family back in the same situation puts them at risk again?

Instead let's disrupt the old way of rebuilding after disasters.

Instead let's disrupt the old way of rebuilding after disasters.

Let's break the cycle of build, destroy, build back the same.

Let's break the cycle of build, destroy, build back the same.

Let's rebuild resiliently.

Let's rebuild resiliently.

Help us bring affordable, disaster-resistant housing to the nation's most vulnerable populations. It costs less than you think.

How We Rebuild Better

Strong Homes partners provide the engineering, product, and technical resources necessary to upgrade homes rebuilt by nonprofit volunteer organizations serving disaster survivors.

Together, we've rebuilt 34 homes in Florida to withstand future disasters, with more planned in Alabama and Louisiana.

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Hurricane Michael Rebuilds

Strong Homes partners helped build new, resilient houses for 34 families that lost everything during Hurricane Michael. The houses have reinforced roofs, sealed roof decks, shutters or impact-resistant windows, and a strong, reinforced, continuous load path. The resilient features provide families with peace of mind that the homes can survive when future hurricanes threaten. 

Beyond-the-Code Design Makes a Strong Home

Strong Homes upgrades disaster-affected homes to meet the IBHS FORTIFIED HomeTM standards for resilient building while adding minimal expense to the cost of construction.

IBHS FORTIFIED Gold™ - Hurricane

Use the interactive schematic to learn more about the IBHS Gold standard for construction in hurricane zones. Follow FORTIFIED to strengthen your home against high winds, hail, hurricanes, and even tornadoes.

Engineered Wall-to-Foundation Connections

Building a singular, solid structure is the key to keeping the roof and home in place when high winds or hurricanes threaten. Roof-to-wall, story-to-story, and wall-to-foundation connections engineered to withstand severe wind and storm pressure create a continuous load path and prevent a home from being leveled.

Engineered Story-to-Story Connection

Building a singular, solid structure is the key to keeping the roof and home in place when high winds or hurricanes threaten. Roof-to-wall, story-to-story, and wall-to-foundation connections engineered to withstand severe wind and storm pressure create a continuous load path and prevent a home from being leveled.

Engineered Roof-to-Wall Connections

Building a singular, solid structure is the key to keeping the roof and home in place when high winds or hurricanes threaten. Roof-to-wall, story-to-story, and wall-to-foundation connections engineered to withstand severe wind and storm pressure create a continuous load path and prevent a home from being leveled.

Stronger Exterior Sheathing

Thicker, impact-resistant structural sheathing can withstand the flying debris that causes exterior walls to fail and allow wind and rain to ravage a home.

Pressure-Rated Windows & Doors

Storm pressure enters through windows and doors, pushing outward on walls and the roof causing catastrophic damage to the home's structure. Windows and doors that are appropriately rated for extreme weather can defend against that pressure.

Gable End Bracing

Unbraced gable ends are a critical weak link for homes hit by high winds. Additional bracing on gables stops the wind from collapsing this section of a home.

Anchored Attached Structures

When high winds flow under a carport or porch roof, it can lift up and rip off part of the house if the structure is anchored improperly. Strong anchors and proper connections on attached structures prevent this type of damage.

Reinforced Soffits

Soffits prevent driving rain from blowing up under roof overhangs and entering the attic, but they're often installed with inadequate support. Using extra bracing and some additional fasteners will keep the soffit in place.

Chimney Bracing

High winds can tear chimney framing off a home's roof, leaving a hole in the roof and allowing interior damage from rain. Building chimneys anchored to the home helps spread the load and prevents tear-offs.

Impact & Pressure-Rated Garage Doors

Wind and storm pressure can quickly come through a compromised garage door, leading to blown-out walls and collapsed roofs. Installing garage doors rated to withstand high pressures and with windows rated to withstand impact from windborne debris (in hurricane-prone areas) prevents garage doors from failing.

Impact Protection for Windows & Doors

Installing window and door protection tested to withstand pressure and impact keeps rain and storm pressures from penetrating the home and quickly escalating damage.

Wind and Rain-Resistant Attic Vents

High winds can pull typical attic vents loose or drive rain sideways, allowing water to enter the home through the vents. Installing attic vents designed to resist wind and rain prevent that water intrusion.

Impact-Resistant Shingles

Using shingles tested to withstand hail up to 2 inches in diameter better protects a home than typical class 4 shingles when tested against realistic hailstones.

Locked Down Roof Edges

When the wind gets underneath the roof edge, it can damage the roof by ripping it away from the home. Using specific materials and installation methods, including a wider drip edge and a fully adhered starter strip, creates a stronger edge system.

Sealed Roof Deck

When wind rips off roof coverings (like shingles, metal panels, or tiles), water can pass through the gaps in the wood beneath and enter the home. Sealing the seams of a roof deck can reduce water intrusion by up to 95%.

Enhanced Roof Deck Attachment

Keeping the roof deck attached helps block storm pressure from entering the home. Switching from common smooth nails to 8D ring-shank nails and decreasing the space between nails can double the uplift a roof can withstand.

Train Your Volunteers on Resilient Rebuilding

Get your team ready to build beyond the code. Show volunteers how to use new disaster resilience products and techniques in your rebuild projects.

Thank you to our National Sponsors

GPP Enterprises
Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety
International Standards Organization
Lowe’s Home Improvement
Renew Financial
Simpson Strong-Tie
State Farm Insurance Group
USAA Insurance Company
Zip System
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